Tainted Chinese Food-Cadium in Rice

Tainted Chinese Food-Cadium Found in Rice

I encourage everyone to read the entire articles from Reuters news service.

I’ve been studying and publishing some on the tainted Chinese food products imported from China.

Reuters article adds more information into the puzzle.  Up to seventy percent (70%) of China’s farmland is affected by pollution.  (Please re-read that).

Approximately 60% of the pesticides the Chinese farmers are using are also contaminating their food supply chain.  Apparently Chinese farmers like to put arsenic in their animal feed to keep down bacteria.

Couple this with they have 40% of their rivers and waterways very polluted with heavy metals which are highly toxic to humans.

Now add to the fact early articles published in this category report that less than 2% of the food we import from China the FDA inspects.

Can you see a disaster recipe of tainted Chinese food?  How in the world can you trust any foods from China?  Why are major food processors like Green Giant and Dole continuing to grow or buy foods there, even process them and import them to the US?  Why can’t these food conglomerates go to South America or Africa if they claim that they can’t afford to grow in the US?

Why are we supporting this self inflicted wound by purchasing potentially tainted Chinese foods, grown or processed, in China?

Think about it!–No Name Attorney

By David Stanway and Niu Shuping

BEIJING |         Wed May 22, 2013 5:20pm EDT

(Reuters) – The discovery of dangerous levels of toxic cadmium in rice sold in the southern city of Guangzhou, the latest in a series of food scandals, has piled more pressure on China to clean up its food chain – possibly at the expense of Mao Zedong’s cherished goal of self-sufficiency.

The ruling Communist Party has long staked its legitimacy on its ability to guarantee domestic staple food supplies, and has pledged to be at least 95 percent self-sufficient even as demand increases and the fastest and biggest urbanization process in history swallows up arable land.

That has led to a drive for quantity rather than quality – securing bumper harvests even from land contaminated by high levels of industrial waste and irrigated with water unfit for human consumption. “China has a big population and we used to face food shortages so the government has focused on quantity,” said Li Guoxiang, a researcher at the state-backed Rural Development Institute of the China Academy of Social Sciences.

But food safety is becoming a bigger worry than food security after a series of scandals ranging from melamine-tainted milk to toxic heavy metals in rice and vegetables – and raising the share of imports may be the least-worst option.

The government, under increasing public pressure and facing anti-pollution protests, has promised to reverse some of the damage done to the environment by three decades of breakneck industrial expansion. But the scale of the problem is huge, especially as China looks to maintain its economic growth, find jobs for millions of new urban residents and ensure that just 9 percent of the world’s land can feed a fifth of the global population.

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Food Imported From China: Are a Few Pennies of Savings Worth the Risk?

Food Imported From China:  Are a Few Pennies of Savings Worth the Risk?

I am posting a series of articles that Mike Adams and Natural News has done on food and other associated health products that we import from China.

Mike is right about the lack of inspections by the FDA on imported food.  My own research shows that imported foods may at best have a 2% chance of being inspected.  Businesses that import foods cannot rely the FDA to assure them that imported foods are safe.

As someone who teaches Business Law to MBA students, companies who import from China do not really appreciate the higher risk of liability that comes from importing Chinese goods.

In a products liability action, even if the reseller exercised some “due diligence” by doing quality control testing on goods imported from China, should the consumer purchaser be injured it will be the reseller and anyone in the supply chain that will be held liable.  The law, jury and judges do not care that the culprit is an ocean away from the courtroom.  And let’s see how successful a U.S. company will be in getting the Chinese manufacturer to reimburse them for their settlements and jury awards to US consumers, much less their court costs and expensive attorneys fees.

Is saving a few pennies or even dollars per item worth that risk?

Think about it–No Name Attorney

Not Even Good Enough for Dog Food:  Imported Food From China Loaded With Chemicals, Dyes, Pesticides and Fake Ingredients

By Mike Adams

May 10, 2013

(NaturalNews) Do you really know what’s in all the food you’re eating that’s  imported from China? If you don’t, you’re actually in good company: The FDA only  inspects 1% – 2% of all the food imported from China, so they don’t know either.  Even when they inspect a shipment, they rarely test it for heavy metals,  pesticides, PCBs or other toxic contaminants.

Mark A. Kastel, Senior Farm  Policy Analyst at The  Cornucopia Institute, added emphasis to this point as he testified this week  in The House Committee on Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on Europe, Eurasia and  Emerging Threats, saying, “We don’t trust, for good reason, the Chinese to  supply ingredients for our dog and cat food. Why should we trust Chinese  exporters for the food that we are feeding our children and  families?”

It’s a good question. Especially when, as Kastel adds, Chinese  food is being routinely found to contain “unapproved chemicals, dyes, pesticides  and outright fraud (fake food).”

Heavily contaminated food from China

As Natural  News has already reported, food from China is frequently found to contain  alarming levels of heavy metals (arsenic, cadmium, lead, mercury) and other  contaminants. Politically, China is a communist dictatorship where freedom of  speech is completely outlawed. Environmental regulations are virtually never  enforced. The culture is one of total deception where lying, cheating, stealing  or committing fraud to get ahead is considered completely acceptable — because  that’s how government is operated there. The moral decay of China  is directly reflected in the alarming dishonesty of the food supply. (Yes, a  country’s food exports will reflect its cultural and political philosophies.  Freedom produces healthy food. Oppression and communism produces deceptive,  deadly food.)

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