Is Truvia Safe? It’s Great At Killing Fruit Flies and is Being Studied As a “Natural” Insecticide

Is Truvia Safe?  It’s Great At Killing Fruit Flies and is Being Studied As a “Natural” Insecticide

Editor’s Note:  Truvia is not “natural”.    Is Truvia safe?

It contains GMO.  (duh…what does that tell us?)  It also contains maltodextrin.  Whether the maltodextrin is genetically modified (most is) or non-GMO, maltodextrin is very unhealthy for diabetics.  It’s a highly glycemic!  If you want to control your diabetes, stay away from maltodextrin!

A big tipoff not to buy Truvia is that it is manufactured by Cargill, a big corporate farming/GMO pusher.

If Truvia kills off fruit flies prematurely, what do you think it’s doing to your gastrointestinal tract, which contains 80% of your immune system?

I’ve seen it in stores but never used it.  Hawked to those who are sugar conscious, diabetic and trying to lose weight, with it containing GMOs and reacting as a natural insecticide (which might be it’s true value), don’t you think the very thing you’re trying to prevent you actually increasing the chances that you will get it?  (i.e., advancing your diabetes, gaining more weight, etc.)

After the below study’s report, if you have been using Truvia, stop!  Please tell anyone you know to read this article!   Be on the lookout for a class action lawsuit.  Trust me, it’s coming!

 

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Truvia sweetener a powerful pesticide; scientists shocked as fruit flies die in less than a week from eating GMO-derived erythritol

(NaturalNews) Truvia sweetener is made from about 99.5% erythritol (a sugar alcohol), and 0.5% rebiana, an extract from the stevia plant (but not at all the same thing as stevia). A shocking new study published in the journal PLOS ONE (1) has found that Truvia, an alternative sweetener manufactured by food giant Cargill, is a potent insecticide that kills fruit flies which consume it.

The study is titled, Erythritol, a Non-Nutritive Sugar Alcohol Sweetener and the Main Component of Truvia, Is a Palatable Ingested Insecticide.

The study found that while fruit flies normally live between 39 and 51 days, those that ate the Truvia ingredient erythritol died in less than a week.

Erythritol made from yeast fed genetically modified corn derivatives

Erythritol is often indirectly derived from genetically modified corn, by the way. Cargill was forced to settle a class action lawsuit last year (2) for labeling Truvia “natural” when it’s actually made from a fermentation process whereby yeast are fed GM corn maltodextrin.

Cargill plays word games with this process, insisting that “erythritol is not derived from corn or dextrose feedstock; it is derived from the yeast organism.”

Yeah, okay, but the yeast are fed GMOs. So they’re playing mind games with their explanations.