Tainted Chinese Food-Cadium in Rice

Tainted Chinese Food-Cadium Found in Rice

I encourage everyone to read the entire articles from Reuters news service.

I’ve been studying and publishing some on the tainted Chinese food products imported from China.

Reuters article adds more information into the puzzle.  Up to seventy percent (70%) of China’s farmland is affected by pollution.  (Please re-read that).

Approximately 60% of the pesticides the Chinese farmers are using are also contaminating their food supply chain.  Apparently Chinese farmers like to put arsenic in their animal feed to keep down bacteria.

Couple this with they have 40% of their rivers and waterways very polluted with heavy metals which are highly toxic to humans.

Now add to the fact early articles published in this category report that less than 2% of the food we import from China the FDA inspects.

Can you see a disaster recipe of tainted Chinese food?  How in the world can you trust any foods from China?  Why are major food processors like Green Giant and Dole continuing to grow or buy foods there, even process them and import them to the US?  Why can’t these food conglomerates go to South America or Africa if they claim that they can’t afford to grow in the US?

Why are we supporting this self inflicted wound by purchasing potentially tainted Chinese foods, grown or processed, in China?

Think about it!–No Name Attorney

By David Stanway and Niu Shuping

BEIJING |         Wed May 22, 2013 5:20pm EDT

(Reuters) – The discovery of dangerous levels of toxic cadmium in rice sold in the southern city of Guangzhou, the latest in a series of food scandals, has piled more pressure on China to clean up its food chain – possibly at the expense of Mao Zedong’s cherished goal of self-sufficiency.

The ruling Communist Party has long staked its legitimacy on its ability to guarantee domestic staple food supplies, and has pledged to be at least 95 percent self-sufficient even as demand increases and the fastest and biggest urbanization process in history swallows up arable land.

That has led to a drive for quantity rather than quality – securing bumper harvests even from land contaminated by high levels of industrial waste and irrigated with water unfit for human consumption. “China has a big population and we used to face food shortages so the government has focused on quantity,” said Li Guoxiang, a researcher at the state-backed Rural Development Institute of the China Academy of Social Sciences.

But food safety is becoming a bigger worry than food security after a series of scandals ranging from melamine-tainted milk to toxic heavy metals in rice and vegetables – and raising the share of imports may be the least-worst option.

The government, under increasing public pressure and facing anti-pollution protests, has promised to reverse some of the damage done to the environment by three decades of breakneck industrial expansion. But the scale of the problem is huge, especially as China looks to maintain its economic growth, find jobs for millions of new urban residents and ensure that just 9 percent of the world’s land can feed a fifth of the global population.

Read More Here

Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply